Tritone or Blues Tonalities

Tritone or blues tonalities

Here you find what Tonalibus calls harmonically anchored tritone or blues tonalities, including hepta-, hexa-, and pentatonalities. They all include their tritone and one or more Reach steps or augmented seconds. With both anchor tones present, the quint and quart, this results in two successive half steps. The Reach step takes off from the prime or quint (or both). That is different than in Reach tonalities. In the tables below you see an overview of the harmonically anchored tritone or blues tonalities that qualified for the catalogue. Their names, as chosen by Tonalibus, reflect their pitch distribution and the position of the Reach interval, or the tonality type.

Fully anchored

Partially anchored

Overview visuals

Tonalibus 1e-3 tonalities - 2021-11 - 58
Tonalibus 1e-3 tonalities - 2021-11 - 56
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Tonalibus 1e-3 tonalities - 2021-11 - 58
Tonalibus 1e-3 tonalities - 2021-11 - 56
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On the page Tonalities, you find a list of all anchored tonalities included in the catalogue, along with a side-by-side juxtaposition of their scale patterns, as well as a general overview of fundamental pitch distribution patterns.

Common characteristics of Tritone or Blues tonalities

Tritone or blues tonality matrix: The octave includes the tritone plus for a heptatonality one, for a hexatonality two, and for a pentatonality three Reach steps (augmented seconds). These take off from the fundamental or from the quint. They are not framed by half steps (or semitones), of which there are three for hepta-, two for hexa-, and one for pentatonalities. When more than one of them, then some are consecutive.